Monthly Archives: December 2018

Another One

Real or The Onion?  “Blind creature that buries head in sand named after Donald Trump

Continue reading
Posted in Onion/Not-Onion | Leave a comment

You Guess

Real or The Onion?  Soldier Has Suspicion Murder Charge Due To His Admission On Live TV  You be the judge.  Answer below.


Continue reading
Posted in Onion/Not-Onion | Leave a comment

Tor’s Matrix

Tor, the SF&F publisher, just sent out a funny chart (under the headline “fear is the cat-killer”) that I felt like sharing:

Posted in Completely Different | Leave a comment

I’m on the ‘This Week in Health Law’ Podcast

Nicholas Terry of Indianan University was kind enough to ask me to join him and other experts on episode 151 (!) of  his podcast, This Week in Health Law (TWIHL) which was devoted to AI and health care:


I am joined by Abbe Gluck, Professor of Law and the Faculty Director of the Solomon Center for Health Law and Policy at Yale Law School. In November 2018 her team pulled together an excellent roundtable on “The Law and Policy of AI, Robotics, and Telemedicine in Health Care.” This episode of TWIH is the first of two taking a deeper dive into just a few of the  issues that were so well presented at the roundtable. Here we were joined by Michael Froomkin, the Laurie Silvers and Mitchell Rubenstein Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Miami School of Law and by Nicholson Price, Assistant Professor of Law at The University of Michigan Law School. Topics ranged from consent in the next generation of healthcare research to data protection, and appropriate regulatory models.

Posted in AI, The Media | Leave a comment

CDT is Doing Something About Voting Security

This is really cool: the Center for Democracy and Technology (CDT) is launching VotingWorks — a public interest non-profit that wants to build better, i.e. safe and secure, voting machines. I love it.

VotingWorks aims to shake up the voting equipment market by creating a new non-profit voting systems manufacturer with the mission of being the public works for voting systems. VotingWorks will do this by developing voting equipment that 1) embody the state-of-the-art in usability, security, design, and development; 2) are affordable to maximize any benefit to all sizes of election jurisdictions; 3) allow speedy, efficient voting processes; and, 4) that is extensible to the needs of all types of localities. And all of this will be developed in the open for the public good.

The need here is very real. Election officials often find themselves stuck between a rock and a hard place when choosing a new voting system; there are often few expensive choices that come with serious limitations in how these systems can be used, modified, improved, and studied. CDT has advised localities in procurement decisions in the past and contributed to efforts where jurisdictions are designing their own voting systems – such as the Los Angeles County VSAP project – and the common factor in all these cases is the wide variety of needs and requirements that elections present, and how few systems can meet them all.

CDT will serve as a home for VotingWorks until it becomes its own non-profit entity. This partnership means VotingWorks is working closely with the CDT’s experienced team to rapidly ramp up operations and begin in earnest the development of affordable, secure, open-source voting machines for use in US public elections.

Two thumbs up from here.  We need this.

Posted in Law: Elections, Sufficiently Advanced Technology | 1 Comment