Category Archives: Zombie Posts

Annals of Safe Waste Disposal

(A note mainly to myself, but please read along.) As a result of some delayed Spring cleaning…ok, very delayed Spring cleaning…I find I have a number of things to dispose of.

The useful items are going to charities.

Most of the trash I know what to do with.

But I have three classes of toxic waste that take special disposal: batteries, compact fluorescent light bulbs (aka CF bulbs), and a very very old non-functioning laptop.

Radio Shack kindly took the batteries, including the one from the laptop. I removed the hard drive for security. The issue is what to do with the carcass.

Miami-Dade doesn’t make either of these tasks easy. The only place I can find that will take the CF bulbs are the County’s Permanent Home Chemical Collection Centers facilities, which are not exactly next door:

The Centers are located in West Dade at 8831 N.W. 58th Street, and in South Dade at 23707 SW 97th Avenue Gate-B. Normal hours of operation are Wednesday through Sunday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The web site doesn’t actually say they take CF Bulbs (although this list includes “fluorescent bulbs” generally), but Greener Miami says they will [2010: Archive.org version], and I trust them. (I did try calling the number for the Centers, but gave up after 10 minutes on hold.) [2010: Miami-Dade has changed the Centers' web site to make clear that they do in fact take CF Bulbs.]

And even if they will take the CF bulbs, they won’t take the electronics. For that I have to go to certain of the Trash & Recycling Centers (the ones marked with a “2″):

  • North Dade 2*
    21500 NW 47 Avenue
  • Norwood
    19901 NW 7 Avenue
  • Palm Springs North 2*
    7870 NW 178 Street
  • West Little River 2*
    1830 NW 79 Street
  • Golden Glades 1, 2*
    140 NW 160 Street
  • Sunset Kendall 2*
    8000 SW 107 Avenue
  • Snapper Creek 1, 3*
    2200 SW 117 Avenue
  • Richmond Heights
    14050 Boggs Drive
  • Chapman Field 3, 4*
    13600 SW 60 Avenue
  • Eureka Drive 2*
    9401 SW 184 Street
  • West Perrine 2*
    16651 SW 107 Ave
  • Moody Drive 1, 2*
    12970 SW 268 Street
  • South Miami Heights
    20800 SW 117 Court

Sigh.

[Original draft 9/3/2008. In preparation for my blog redesign, I've been going through draft blog posts that somehow never made it to publication. This is one of them.]

2010: I still have the light bulbs somewhere.  And as I’m doing another round of cleaning now, the piles of toxics are likely to grow.

Posted in Miami, Zombie Posts | 3 Comments

Attrapé

Yahoo Groupes (sic) is unhappy with me:

Votre navigateur n’accepte pas les cookies. Pour afficher cette page, vous devez modifier les préférences de votre navigateur pour qu’il accepte les cookies. (Code 0)

And it’s true too.

Somehow “Votre navigateur n’accepte pas les cookies” seems like amazing Franglais. This is why I wonder if I still speak French sometimes: The language has borrowed so much English that it has left me behind.

When I go to France, I sometimes wonder if people think I sound like someone speaking Edwardian English. If I could only convince myself the effect was Shakespearean …

[Original draft 1/15/10. As part of my blog redesign, I've been going through draft blog posts that somehow never made it to publication. This is one of them.]

Posted in Internet, Zombie Posts | 4 Comments

Other Places, Other Lives

Outpost Nine :: Editorials :: I am a Japanese School Teacher (2010: Linkrot — archive.org version is here):

In August 2003 I moved to Kyoto, Japan as a part of the JET program. I am an assistant language teacher in three Jr. High schools. The experience has been…interesting to say the least.

One of the cool things about the Internet is the window it gives you into other lives–although one certainly could suggest here that the window is more into the life of the writer than into the life of the Japanese students he writes about.

I sometimes think that in the long run, one of the major things this medium will do for us is make new sorts of national and international connections more common. A few years ago, I suggested that,

The Blogosphere is young, but it shows some signs of potentially evolving into a miniature public sphere of its own, a sphere of shared interests rather than shared geography. Conceivably, the rise of a Blog culture, even one composed primarily of nonpolitical, wholly personal diaries, may enrich the public sphere. The impulse to read some Blogs may not be that different from the impulse that brings viewers to soap operas, but the experience of regularly encountering another person’s diary, of following along in a stranger’s life, might have value. If it encourages readers to identify with someone different from themselves, it encourages them to attempt “the intellectual exercise of viewing life from the perspective of others — to try to walk in each others’ shoes, to respect each other enough to engage in honest discourse, and to recognize in each other basic rights so as to create sufficient autonomy to make the discourse possible.” That encouragement is only part of what is needed for discourse ethics to flourish, but it is a start.

It’s an optimistic, perhaps unrealistic, hope, but it connects to some important theoretical commitments and aspirations,

If a social and legal system reproduces itself in a way that disables honest discourse among citizens, then it deserves to be criticized: it is not legitimate, and is potentially evil. A Hobbesian predator’s value system is more than just repulsive to outsiders — it is substantively invalid in terms of discourse ethics because by putting such heightened value on short-term selfish material gain and so little value on the needs or rights of anyone other than the individual, it prevents the victims of that worldview from engaging in the very discourse that might allow them to learn why they are making themselves so miserable. In contrast, a social system that encourages citizens to embark on the intellectual exercise of viewing life from the perspective of others — to try to walk in each others’ shoes, to respect each other enough to engage in honest discourse, and to recognize in each other basic rights so as to create sufficient autonomy to make dis-course possible — is on the path to legitimate lawmaking. Such a society enjoys at least a relative legitimacy, even if the rules in place today are not the ones that discourse theory would demand.

It may seem absurd to connect any of this to the author of Outpost Nine, an American guy dodging Japanese school children who he claims want to do unspeakable things to him in the hallways. He doesn’t quite seem up to bearing all this freight, or even much of it. But in the end, we’re all in it together.

[Original draft 5/10/2006. As part of my blog redesign, I've been going through draft blog posts that somehow never made it to publication. This is one of them.]

2010: The links in this piece all seem to be dead, at least as far as the teacher’s diary is concerned, and replaced with uninteresting ‘editorials’ about his love life. Which is sort of a shame, as the stuff about Japanese schoolchildren was, modulo unreliable narrator, a window into a very foreign world. I’m posting it anyway, (with a link to archive.org for those who care about (alleged) weirdness in Japanese schools) as the parts about the Internet reflect what I was thinking about in 2006, and still gnaw on today.

Posted in Internet, Zombie Posts | 3 Comments

Stop Windows from Copying Files Accidentally When Ctrl-Click Selecting

Fixing Annoyances: Stop Windows from Copying Files Accidentally When Ctrl-Click Selecting :: the How-To Geek

[Original draft 5/10/2008. In preparation for my blog redesign, I've been going through draft blog posts that somehow never made it to publication. This is one of them.]

2010: Since I implemented this fix, I’ve never had the problem again.

Posted in Software, Zombie Posts | 2 Comments

I So Don’t Do This Networking Stuff

How to Save the World, a blog I generally like, has a repulsive essay, The Ten Keys To Effective Networking.

The item is repulsive in part because it credibly argues that careers are furthered by treating people as means rather then ends, by selling yourself in a soundbite, and the display and exchange of favors. I’m fine with the exchange of favors stuff — I’m not that much of an ivory tower guy — and I understand that there are times in life when you have to sell. But the idea that you “prune your networks” (abandon people who are not useful), and “understand that every conversation is an implicit contract” (nothing can be abstractly interesting?) is just too much like what I least liked about living in Washington D.C.

And yes, there are a bunch of neat people I’ve met over the years that I wish I kept up with. Life just gets in the way.

[Original draft 3/21/2004. As part of my blog redesign, I've been going through draft blog posts that somehow never made it to publication. This is one of them.]

2010: I was reminded of this last night: we went to a very swanky law school event at an large and quite elegant home some small ways south of here. The guest list was studded with important people and large donors.   I didn’t recognize many of them, and ran away from one of the few I did — a right-wing local congressperson — since it seemed like an occasion where I should be polite.   We spoke to a few people we knew.  We went home.

Posted in Readings, Zombie Posts | 6 Comments

Can Lawyers Hire Folks to Pose As Law Students to Get Links to the Firm’s Web Site?

Here’s a real-life event that might make a good short-answer problem for a Professional Responsibility final exam.

Today I received an email purporting to be from a law student. The sender’s email address was [common-first-name]@edu-student-mail.org. The subject line was “Suggestion for your page [URL]” with the URL being a fairly obscure page from an Internet law seminar I gave in 1998.

Here’s the text:

Hi!

I came across your site today while doing some research on intellectual property for one of my law classes. You provide some really great resources, but on your page http://www.law.miami.edu/~froomkin/sem98/sem11.htm I tried to click on your link to http://www.eff.org/pub/Intellectual_property and it doesn’t seem to be working. I also found this page in my research which could provide similar information if you wanted to check it out :) [here followed a URL to a site advertising personal injury lawyers that I've cut out to avoid rewarding this behavior].

Best,

[First-Name Last-Name]

I responded with an email asking what law school she attended. Haven’t gotten an answer.

Suppose, just hypothetically (we have no reason to believe this at present), that the name is a fake and this was in fact an advertising message for the California PI firm sponsoring the website in the message.

Is this (hypothetical) duplicity banned by the California legal ethics code? I’m not a member of the California Bar, so I don’t know the answer to this one. A cursory glance at Rule 1-400. Advertising and Solicitation. makes me wonder if there isn’t maybe a gap in the rules.

The California ethics rules prohibit making false statements to potential clients, actual clients, opposing parties, and the courts. They also prohibit false statements to third parties about cases in which the lawyer is involved. But there doesn’t seem to be anything about hiring an agent to make a false statement to a third party (me) designed to get (let us hypothesize) accurate publicity for the lawyer, that is a link to the firm’s site.

The rules do say, among other things, that

A communication [defined as: "any message or offer made by or on behalf of a member concerning the availability for professional employment of a member or a law firm directed to any former, present, or prospective client"] or a solicitation ["any communication: (1) Concerning the availability for professional employment of a member or a law firm in which a significant motive is pecuniary gain;"] (as defined herein) shall not:

(1) Contain any untrue statement; or

(2) Contain any matter, or present or arrange any matter in a manner or format which is false, deceptive, or which tends to confuse, deceive, or mislead the public

It doesn’t seem to me that, true or false, the email I quoted above qualifies as either a “communication” or a “solicitation” under these rules. So I have to think it is not covered.

But shouldn’t sleazy lying marketing designed to promote a website be as unethical as a lie to a potential client or lies on that website?

Maybe the person who sent that email was real. But even if she is, the gap in the rules this email made me think about may be real too.

(I’d welcome enlightenment from anyone more familiar with the California rules.)

[Original draft 2/2/10.  In preparation for my blog redesign, I've been going through draft blog posts that somehow never made it to publication. This is one of them.]

12/12/2010: Never did get an answer to my email.

Posted in Law: Ethics, Zombie Posts | Leave a comment

Elves are from Europe, Mortals from Cleveland

ElfpunkEurope and Faerie [Update: link fixed] suggests that “the entire genre of elfpunk is really about the way intelligent and sympathetic Europeans and Americans view each other today.”

There’s at least enough truth in this proposed metaphor about modern fantasy with elves and cities to make a very entertaining blog entry, even if I’m not 100% certain — well, not even 50% certain — as to which of the elves-at-the-gates books I’ve read for which this sort of works qualify as elfpunk.

(spotted via 0xDECAFBAD).

[Original draft 3/29/2004. As part of my blog redesign, I've been going through draft blog posts that somehow never made it to publication. This is one of them.]

2010: I should have deleted this one, but I love the title.

Posted in Readings, Zombie Posts | 1 Comment