Monthly Archives: April 2005

Guess-the-Google

Grant Robinson : Guess-the-google launcher. A silly game in which they show you a bunch of Google images and ask you to guess the search word that produced them. A third of the time the word appears in the pictures, so this should be easy, right?

I only got 268 points. Rats.

Posted in Internet | 1 Comment

A Pithy Summary of Bush Press Conference Remarks on Social Security

Via Dan's Not Exactly Must-See TV, this perfect quote from Michael Tackett in the Chicago Tribune:

President Bush on Thursday used a format he does not like to discuss issues he cannot resolve in hopes that he can sell the American people on policies most say they don't want.

Posted in Econ: Social Security | 1 Comment

Crypto Policy Reaches for the End of the Line

Security bosses seek to dissolve encryption bans: An international security consortium is set to lobby governments around the world to withdraw restrictions on encryption standards.

The Jericho Forum, whose membership includes many chief security officers from FTSE 100 companies, will push for the removal of encryption restrictions within the next three-to-five years.

The odd thing about this is that it comes at a time in which governments are making noises about wanting more wiretaps and more control (see e.g. the move to make VOIP and thus in effect every Internet communication easily tapped). And in the background are complaints about encryption.

On the other hand, one gets the impression that government cracking technology available to civilian law enforcement has taken some leaps forward lately, which can only make you wonder what the NSA is holding back.

Posted in Cryptography | 2 Comments

Links We Cannot Resist Dept.

Birds May Be Behind Exploding German Toads.

Please note that this is filed under “Science” not humor, because it's apparently true.

Posted in Science/Medicine | 2 Comments

.pdf Versions of Official US Reports

This looks useful!

The Volokh Conspiracy – PDF Copies of the United States Reports: Most lawyers and law students know that that the U.S. Supreme Court website posts slip opinions of recent cases. What you might not know is that as the Court publications unit finalizes its slip opinions and eventually compiles them into bound volumes of the United States Reports, it also makes the entire contents of individual volumes of the United States Reports available as individual .pdf files. The service begins with Volume 502 (October 1991), and currently goes as far as Volume 538 (through May 27, 2003). This means that you can download entire volumes of the U.S. Reports and save them to your hard drive for subsequent searching and use offline — with the correct pagination, italics, appendices, charts, and graphs — all for free. Really cool, at least if you're into that kind of thing.

Posted in Law: Everything Else | 2 Comments

The Clients from Hell

Clientcopia : Coping with stupid clients is funny in a tragic sort of way.

Law is a service business. So to all the law students reading this blog, I say, Take Notes! Because you too will someday have a Client from Hell.

Posted in Completely Different | 3 Comments

Louis Fisher Slams Detention of US Citizens Without Trial in CRS Report

Secrecy News 04/28/05 breaks the story of a new report from the Congressional Research Service that disputes the Bush Administration's claim that the President has unlimited authority to detain American citizens in wartime if he deems them to be enemy combatants.

Significantly, “Detention of U.S. Citizens,” Congressional Research Service, April 28, 2005, is by the highly respected Louis Fisher, an authority on constitutional law.

The introduction says that the report is aimed at a core issue raised in the Padilla case:

In 1971, Congress passed legislation to repeal the Emergency Detention Act of 1950 and to enact the following language: “No citizen shall be imprisoned or otherwise detained by the United States except pursuant to an Act of Congress.” The new language, codified at 18 U.S.C. §4001(a), is called the Non-Detention Act. This statutory provision received attention after the 9/11 terrorist attacks when the Administration designated certain U.S. citizens as “enemy combatants” and claimed the right to detain them indefinitely without charging them, bringing them to trial, or giving them access to counsel. In litigation over Yaser Esam Hamdi and Jose Padilla, both designated enemy combatants, the Administration has argued that the Non-Detention Act restricts only imprisonments and detentions by the Attorney General, not by the President or military authorities.

And the conclusion is blunt:

Legislative debate, committee reports, and the political context of 1971 indicate that when Congress enacted Section 4001(a) it intended the statutory language to restrict all detentions by the executive branch, not merely those by the Attorney General. Lawmakers, both supporters and opponents of Section 4001(a), recognized that it would restrict the President and military authorities.

Posted in Civil Liberties | Leave a comment