Monthly Archives: May 2014

Intimidating Critics Is an International Governmental Phenomenon

This British police intimidation of a blogger is much less heavy-handed than the hammer the Mayor of Peoria brought down on a parody Twitter account.

The Cambridge, UK story is, however, creepy insofar as it could be read to suggest that the police support the far-right UKIP party. Then again, the UKIP complainant was a local councillor, so maybe it really is the somewhat-less-unkind UK version of the Peoria story. After all, in Cambridge, no property was damaged or seized or destroyed. And no judges signed off on spurious warrants either.

Posted in Civil Liberties, Law: Free Speech, UK | Leave a comment


Anti-surveillance mask lets you pass as someone else

Posted in Surveillance | Leave a comment

Adlaw: The Video

The Chevron Two-Step:

via Above the Law.

Posted in Law: Administrative Law | Leave a comment

Law Students Invited to Publish

Friend and fellow lawprof Dan Hunter passes on this call for papers aimed at law students:

CALL FOR PAPERS Special Edition for emerging socio-legal scholars

QUT Law Review invites articles for its forthcoming Special Edition, highlighting emerging issues in Law and socio-legal disciplines.

For this special issue, we are seeking submissions from students undertaking higher degrees by research and from other early career researchers. We aim to highlight a broad range of emerging issues and provide an overview of research currently in progress.

This Special Edition is designed to provide an introduction to academic publishing for higher degree by research students. Articles will be subject to rigorous blind peer review, but we encourage submissions that present projects still in progress and do not yet have firm conclusions or results. Peer reviewers will focus on the ability of the article to present a novel methodological or conceptual approach to an existing problem or to identify a new socio-legal issue that has not been extensively studied. Submitted manuscripts will also be evaluated for technical competency and standard English expression.

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Posted in Law School, Talks & Conferences | Leave a comment