Lessons from the Identity Trail Published Today

ID-trail-med.pngLessons from the Identity Trail (Ian Kerr, Valerie Steeves & Carole Lucock, eds.), a whale of a book, is being published today.

During the past decade, rapid developments in information and communications technology have transformed key social, commercial, and political realities. Within that same time period, working at something less than Internet speed, much of the academic and policy debate arising from these new and emerging technologies has been fragmented. There have been few examples of interdisciplinary dialogue about the importance and impact of anonymity and privacy in a networked society. Lessons from the Identity Trail: Anonymity, Privacy and Identity in a Networked Society fills that gap, and examines key questions about anonymity, privacy, and identity in an environment that increasingly automates the collection of personal information and relies upon surveillance to promote private and public sector goals.

This book has been informed by the results of a multi-million dollar research project that has brought together a distinguished array of philosophers, ethicists, feminists, cognitive scientists, lawyers, cryptographers, engineers, policy analysts, government policy makers, and privacy experts. Working collaboratively over a four-year period and participating in an iterative process designed to maximize the potential for interdisciplinary discussion and feedback through a series of workshops and peer review, the authors have integrated crucial public policy themes with the most recent research outcomes.

The book is available for download under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 Canada License by chapter. Hard copies are available for purchase at Amazon & at Oxford University Press.

I've got two chapters in it, Identity Cards and Identity Romanticism and Anonymity and the Law in the United States. And I'm very pleased to be in such wonderful company — it was a valuable conference full of interesting people and the materials collected here are going to be of interest to people in many of the cross-cutting fields around the world. And the chapters are (painfully) short.

The full Table of Contents, with links to the online versions of the chapters is below. Some chapters won't be released for a few weeks, so keep an eye on the main site for updates.

About this Book
Acknowledgements
Contributors
The Strange Return of Gyges’ Ring : An Introduction

I. Privacy

Introduction to Part I

Chapter 1. Soft Surveillance, Hard Consent: The Law and Psychology of Engineering Consent
by IAN KERR, JENNIFER BARRIGAR, JACQUELYN BURKELL, AND KATIE BLACK

Chapter 2. Approaches to Consent in Canadian Data Protection Law 23
by PHILIPPA LAWSON AND MARY O'DONOGHUE

Chapter 3. Learning from Data Protection Law at the Nexus of Copyright and Privacy
by ALEX CAMERON

Chapter 4. A Heuristics Approach to Understanding Privacy-Protecting Behaviors in Digital Social Environments 187.21 Kb
by ROBERT CAREY AND JACQUELYN BURKELL

Chapter 5. Ubiquitous Computing and Spatial Privacy (available April 22nd)
by ANNE UTECK

Chapter 6. Core Privacy: A Problem for Predictive Data Mining (available April 22nd)
by JASON MILLAR

Chapter 7. Privacy Versus National Security: Clarifying the Trade-Off (available April 22nd)
by JENNIFER CHANDLER

Chapter 8. Privacy’s Second Home: Building a New Home for Privacy Under Section 15 of the Charter (available April 22nd)
by DAPHNE GILBERT

Chapter 9. What Have You Done for Me Lately? Reflections on Redeeming Privacy for Battered Women (available May 6th)
by JENA MCGILL

Chapter 10. Genetic Technologies and Medicine: Privacy, Identity, and Informed Consent (available May 6th)
by MARSHA HANEN

Chapter 11. Reclaiming the Social Value of Privacy (available May 6th)
by VALERIE STEEVES

II. IDENTITY

Introduction to Part II

Chapter 12. A Conceptual Analysis of Identity 154.83 Kb
by STEVEN DAVIS

Chapter 13. Identity: Difference and Categorization 202.97 Kb
by CHARLES D. RAAB

Chapter 14. Identity Cards and Identity Romanticism 341.48 Kb
by A. MICHAEL FROOMKIN

Chapter 15. What’s in a Name? Who Benefits from the Publication Ban in Sexual Assault Trials? 215.82 Kb
by JANE DOE

Chapter 16. Life in the Fish Bowl: Feminist Interrogations of Webcamming (available April 22nd)
by JANE BAILEY

Chapter 17. Ubiquitous Computing, Spatiality, and the Construction of Identity: Directions for Policy Response (available April 22nd)
by DAVID J. PHILLIPS

Chapter 18. Dignity and Selective Self-Presentation (available April 22nd)
by DAVID MATHESON

Chapter 19. The Internet of People? Reflections on the Future Regulation of Human-Implantable Radio Frequency Identification (available April 22nd)
by IAN KERR

Chapter 20. Using Biometrics to Revisualize the Canada–U.S. Border (available May 6th)
by SHOSHANA MAGNET

Chapter 21. Soul Train: The New Surveillance in Popular Music (available May 6th)
by GARY T. MARX

Chapter 22. Exit Node Repudiation for Anonymity Networks (available May 6th)
by JEREMY CLARK, PHILIPPE GAUVIN, AND CARLISLE ADAMS

Chapter 23. TrackMeNot: Resisting Surveillance in Web Search (available May 6th)
by DANIEL C. HOWE AND HELEN NISSENBAUM

III. ANONYMITY

Introduction to Part III

Chapter 24. Anonymity and the Law in the United States
by A. MICHAEL FROOMKIN

Chapter 25. Anonymity and the Law in Canada
by CAROLE LUCOCK AND KATIE BLACK

Chapter 26. Anonymity and the Law in the United Kingdom (available April 22nd)
by IAN LLOYD

Chapter 27. Anonymity and the Law in the Netherlands (available May 6th)
by SIMONE VAN DER HOF, BERT JAAP KOOPS, AND RONALD LEENES

Chapter 28. Anonymity and the Law in Italy (available May 6th)
by GIUSELLA FINOCCHIARO

This entry was posted in ID Cards, Law: Constitutional Law, Law: International Law, Writings. Bookmark the permalink.

14 Responses to Lessons from the Identity Trail Published Today

  1. Adam says:

    This looks awesome, but $99 awesome? What’s up with that?

  2. michael says:

    Er, free downloads, mumble, creative commons, mumble, publishers, mumble, I just work here.

  3. Adam says:

    Fair enough, but I think it’s worth being aware of the prices. I did a bunch of digging for a recent post on self-publishing, and it seems that you could get this out of Amazon for less than 1/2 the price.

  4. Adam says:

    Fair enough. I just want to buy the bound book, and find it hard to justify that price. I shouldn’t take it out on you.

  5. LACJ says:

    Actually the publishing industry in academia is well due for a correction, in a broad sense. Not to imply this particular title is unreasonably priced, (you must expect a higher price for niche goods), but academic publishers have long relied on meaningless changes to justify additional versions.

    Not a horrible system by many accounts but still horribly wasteful in terms of used pulp…

  6. LACJ says:

    Huh, Adam, you want a bound book but the price is troublesome? While I appreciate the constraints we all live under, the preference for a bound book as opposed to paperback is a significant distinction.

    A paperback is information, simply. A bound volume is art and will always be priced as such.

    In any case, I am enjoying your website.

  7. soulgeek says:

    But the support at Lulu.com is not worth it as well as the payment process is also a pain, me personal experience as i publish my writing on Law of Attraction

  8. This is just what I was looking for in particular, Predictive Data Mining. I’m probably going to order a copy from Amazon UK (58 pounds). Thanks for the review. I will leave a review on Amazon if I order.

  9. Albert says:

    Some publishing industries are horrible, but you should invest in a better industry if your a serious marketer who wants their word out.

  10. zen says:

    who cares if the book is paperback or bound and the price should not be of concern either- if you see value in the contents of the book then it is a worthy investment. that is it. an investment that you expect a return on.

    Thanks for the review copy.

    [ads deleted by the management]

  11. Tom says:

    This book is very great, I bought this book on Amazon yesterday, a little expensive but I hope it worth.

  12. Bluestone says:

    What a valuable book and free of charge thank you so much.

  13. Awesome stuff. Thanks for sharing the review copy

  14. Best MMO Racing Game says:

    $99 a bit pricey, but i think i’ll take the dive and buy it.

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