Evidence that ‘Thinking With Your Gut’ Works?

The right gut bacteria can make you more or less stressful, and perhaps more or less clever too:

And now evidence is emerging that these tiny organisms may also have a profound impact on the brain too. They are a living augmentation of your body – and like any enhancement, this means they could, in principle, be upgraded.

His team tested the effects of two strains of bacteria, finding that one improved cognition in mice. His team is now embarking on human trials, to see if healthy volunteers can have their cognitive abilities enhanced or modulated by tweaking the gut microbiome.

— BBC, Body bacteria: Can your gut bugs make you smarter?, via Slashdot, Gut Bacteria Affect the Brain.

Apparently a very monotonous diet reduces the variety of gut bacteria. I’m just waiting to hear that processed food was a long-term Communist plot to make us dumber.

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3 Responses to Evidence that ‘Thinking With Your Gut’ Works?

  1. Chesave says:

    Dear if bacteria really attack what i can do?

  2. Zorensen Leverthal says:

    Gut bacteria are getting a lot of attention just now. Your body has 10x as many bacterial cells in it than cells with your own DNA (bacteria are smaller). These bacteria are introduced to your body during breast feeding, before your immune system fully forms, so that your body’s immune system actually can’t tell the difference between these bacteria and your own body. These bacteria help in digestion and live in your sinuses and on your skin, out-competing harmful bacteria.

    Imbalances in gut bacteria are currently being investigated for its relationship to a host of developmental problems, including autism.

    Incidentally, while the herbicides used on many crops are designed to be non-toxic to mammals, they are still toxic to gut bacteria, and the accumulation of these toxins in food may be in part responsible for the recent increase in digestive disorders like gluten intolerance.

  3. Jon Stevens says:

    Interesting post. Thanks for sharing this one!

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