Amazon.com is Offering Free Prime Memership to “College Students” — Does That Include Law Students? (Updated)

Amazon.com has a new promotion out to offer free two-day shipping to college students who have a .edu address and can supply the name of their college and their major. (They're also going to market to you incessantly, but that's what filters are for.)

According to the Amazon Student Terms & Conditions:

To sign up for and use Amazon Student, you must (1) have an Amazon.com account, (2) be a college student actively enrolled in at least one course at a college geographically located in one of the 50 United States or the District of Columbia, (3) be able to provide proof of enrollment upon request and (4) have a valid e-mail address that contains the domain suffix .edu. We may accept or refuse membership in our sole discretion. We may ask you to furnish documentation supporting your eligibility. If you do not provide documentation indicating that you meet the eligibility requirements above, you may be required to reimburse us for benefits you received as a result of your Amazon Student membership. The Amazon Student membership is for personal use only and not for the purpose of resale. You may not transfer or assign your Amazon Student membership or the benefits associated with an Amazon Student membership.

Does this offer of a free year of Amazon Prime include law students? Sadly, I have to think that as worded it does not: law students (except those few in a free-standing law school) are in a University, but only the undergraduates are in the “college.”

Join me in calling on Amazon to extend this promotion to graduate and professional students — they need books too!

(Spotted via Lifehacker)

UPDATE — Good news: Commentator Keith reports that when he went to sign up,

The two drop-down menus (one for level and one for field of study) contained explicit options for graduate students, specifically including law students.

So, law students, you're in! (I still have to pay $79/year.)

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4 Responses to Amazon.com is Offering Free Prime Memership to “College Students” — Does That Include Law Students? (Updated)

  1. Keith says:

    I was able to join just now, so it appears graduate and professional students are included.

    What a great deal! Thanks for the tip.

  2. michael says:

    Or that the automated systems were not built with this issue in mind? Was there an explicit option for law students? If not, consider this from the terms and conditions quoted above:

    If you do not provide documentation indicating that you meet the eligibility requirements above, you may be required to reimburse us for benefits you received as a result of your Amazon Student membership.

  3. Keith says:

    The two drop-down menus (one for level and one for field of study) contained explicit options for graduate students, specifically including law students.

    I would imagine the quoted section applies to people who are no longer students, but have retained their .edu email addresses.

  4. Keith says:

    The choice of “college students” in the wording of the offer may have been made simply because so few people (at least in the modern-day United States) are able to make the distinction between “college” and “university,” and “college” is the more widely used of the two.

    If Amazon had extended the offer to “university” students, (sadly) I think it’s entirely possible that half the students in the United States would’ve thought it was only available to Canadian and European students.

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